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Will Quantum Computers break encryption?

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How do you secure messages over the internet? How do quantum computers break it? How do you fix it? Why don’t you watch the video to find out? Why does this description have so many questions? Why are you still reading? What is the meaning of life?

0:00 Intro – Are we DOOOOMED??
0:52 How NOT to Send Secret Messages
2:09 RSA – Encryption Today
5:19 One-Way Functions and Post-Quantum Cryptography
7:28 Qubits and Measurement
9:03 BB84 – Quantum Cryptography
12:43 Alternatives and Problems
14:26 A Case for Quantum Computing

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CLARIFICATIONS:
You don’t actually need a quantum computer to do quantum-safe encryption. As briefly mentioned at 7.04 , there are encryption schemes that can be run on regular computers that can’t be broken by quantum computers.

CORRECTIONS:

“The public key can only be used to scramble information.” (2.18) Technically, you can use any key to encrypt or decrypt whatever you want. But there’s a specific way to use them that’s useful, which is what’s shown in the video.
“Given a private key, it’s easy to create its corresponding public key.” (5.36) In RSA, depending on exactly what you mean by “private key”, neither key is actually derivable from the other. When they are created, they are generated together from a common base (not just the public key from the private key). But typically, the file that stores the “private key” actually contains a bit more information than just the private key. For example, in PKCS #1 RSA private key format ( ), the file technically contains the entire public key too. So in short, you technically can’t get the public key from the private key or vice versa, but the file that contains the private key can hold more than just the private key alone, making it possible to retrieve the public key from it.

Video links:

Encryption and HUGE numbers – Numberphile

The No Cloning Theorem – minutephysics

Quantum Entanglement & Spooky Action at a Distance – Veritasium

Sources:

Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists

Random person talking about Quantum MITM attacks

The Ekert Protocol (i.e. E91)

Annealing vs. Universal Quantum Computers

Images, Documents, and Screenshots:

Post-Quantum Cryptography initiatives

Internet map (Carna Botnet)

Quantum network maps

IBM Quantum

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The House of Leaves

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Source: https://blogema.org
Read more all post Computer Technology : https://blogema.org/computer/
40 Comments
  1. Frame of Essence says

    CLARIFICATIONS:
    You don't actually need a quantum computer to do quantum-safe encryption. As briefly mentioned at 7:04 , there are encryption schemes that can be run on regular computers that can't be broken by quantum computers.
    CORRECTIONS:
    [2:18] Technically, you can use any key to encrypt or decrypt whatever you want. But there's a specific way to use them that's useful, which is what's shown in the video.
    [5:36] In RSA, depending on exactly what you mean by "private key", neither key is actually derivable from the other. When they are created, they are generated together from a common base (not just the public key from the private key). But typically, the file that stores the "private key" actually contains a bit more information than just the private key. For example, in PKCS #1 RSA private key format ( https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3447#appendix-A.1.2 ), the file technically contains the entire public key too. So in short, you technically can't get the public key from the private key or vice versa, but the file that contains the private key can hold more than just the private key alone, making it possible to retrieve the public key from it.

  2. Matt's twin says

    The hacker has the scrambler so he could just scramble a message and see the similarities for example translating "a b c" to see what they mean

  3. Zain Ahmed says

    So good I bought multiple lava lamps and a webcam, no quantum pc can break codes scrambled by lava lamps lol.

  4. Mohammad M says

    "Can you mine bitcoin with a quantum computer?"
    Well yes but actually yes
    "Can you mine double hashed bitcoin?"
    Well… no

  5. man of culture says

    what about internet phishing?

  6. moter land says

    In an old macOS version most likely Tiger, you can acually view your "Private key" So no, not only the server can see your Private Key, you can see it too!

  7. nathan johns says

    heres my encription idea: when you send a message the message turns into a specific set of letters in which seem "random" there not random. anyways when you send it to the server it calculates what its saying by know what the letters are. this only works if the hacker gets it first then the server

    EDIT: ok maybe it wont work because all servers will have the same encryption and somebody may finally find the code

  8. Bhavani m says

    4:35 Eavesdropper:Oh yeah I got the private key
    You & server : Hahaha ?

  9. Bhavani m says

    Wut

  10. batuhan şekeroğlu says

    This is a very good explanation of encryption though.

  11. Peter Hart says

    Devil guy before are we doomed said “F Yeah!”

  12. Pracheer Deka says

    QUANTUM MEANS 2 COMPUTER WORKS ON SAME TIME WITH SYNC…

  13. Neil says

    There would be no need for internet security if it weren't for evil people

  14. Indie says

    5:18
    F NO

  15. kostas trip says

    9:57 When I and the server compare our orientations, how can we be sure that the eavesdropper doesn't get that information? Can someone explain to me?

  16. Sebastian Rivera says

    so basically no

  17. KhmerD0g says

    HELL NO.
    Someone will come up with stronger encryption. Will the 1024-bit encryption be strong enough?

  18. Damon S says

    So aren't cryptocurrency going to be encrypted protected?

  19. Carson Pena says

    yes

  20. Franciszek Boehlke says

    Actually, it doesn't need to be easy to create a private key for the given public key. In RSA you generate both from some common data – it is easy to create a pair from a random piece of data that you can then forget.

  21. Nirosh Liyanawaduge says

    Looks like there are number of mistake in this video.. I don't see quantum entanglement is mentioned at all. This is used in the process of exchanging keys. and He is talking about generating a random bit based key and then converting that to qbit key which is also wrong.. You can just generate truly random key directly from a quantum computer.. and pass it through a quantum gate to measure.. 

    I think this video is confusing people

  22. Stealth189237409 says

    identity theft is the real problem

  23. John says

    …so what about quantum encryption?

  24. Josh Martin says

    Why build an entirely new quantum infrastructure when ECC advances such as supersingular elliptic curve isogeny cryptography would be as efficient as modern day cryptography, but also quantum resistant?

  25. Jack Langley says

    This whole video sounds like a vpn ad

  26. first last says

    Another problem, if these quantum computers are too cost prohibitive for the average person to have, so that only powerful governmental agencies and other wealthy entities can break encryption where as the means to avoid this way too expensive for the average person.

  27. Sagiv Bh says

    Why Eve cant use quantum computer to guess the quantum key?

  28. Ultramate Gamer says

    This just sounds like the enigma code to me, and bombe is the quantum computer, using bombe today would just never work. So, it's not the end of the world.

  29. Gao XiangShuai says

    What?….

  30. Aleksander Muszyński says

    TL;DW: I used the cubits to encrypt the cubits

  31. Skid_2D says

    but it cant break "doctor handwriting" encryption

  32. MrSeppieD says

    My answer on a computer science exam: ��������
    Teacher: What is this supposed to mean?
    Me: It's the requested 8bit answer, but expressed in qubits. It represents the correct answer if and only if you know the correct answer as well.

  33. Raj Aryan Agrawal says

    In the BB84 method, why can't the eavesdropper get the qubits as well which the person received?
    Because if he has those qubits and the a list of which orientations were correct, he can create a key as well
    And at 10:20 u even say the eavesdropper has the qubits that person recieved as well.

  34. Force Gameplay says

    Me at am3:20, watching this

  35. Force Gameplay says

    Whats about TOR and nobody knows, who he need to eavsdrop [200iq]

  36. Mr Sayner says

    2:05 The guy that invented that is such a genius

  37. Oeshen Playz1036 says

    maybe by quantum physics the bits will rotate a 360 going towards you and the ease dropper gets something different and you can do the same thing to the server

  38. KumPupp says

    when u lock a key to open a lock

  39. slimemaster561 ROBLOX says

    dear stranger who ever likes this comment: may your mother live 100 more years(dad to)

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